In general, buying vintage audio sound systems can be very beneficial and fulfilling. However, you need to cautious about what you purchase and how you match components together. Remember that as with most things, there are good and bad items scattered at every price range. Here are some important tips that you need to keep in mind when buying vintage audio sound systems.

Grabbing a Bargain

As with any online auction, there are certain actions you can do to boost your chances of getting a bargain. For example, late bids are often better to prevent increase the price too soon. Mis-categorized items also tend to neglected by many potential buyers. Online marketplaces have a lot of categories where you can find an amplifier, so make sure that you check all possible categories, such as Receivers, Hi-Fi Systems, and Amplifiers. Another great category to look into is Vintage Audio and Video. Many collectors are able to score bargains because of the seller’s mis-categorization.

Size

One of the primary considerations before purchasing a pair of vintage speakers is the size of the speaker cones. For instance, a larger woofer will be able to generate a fuller bass sound. Speakers that have three cones (i.e., a woofer, mid, and tweeter) will typically create a richer sound compared to speakers that only have two cones. A lot of speakers also have power recommendations printed on the back panel. Remember that speakers can be damaged if they are under- or over-powered.

Amplifier

An important factor to take into account is the amplifier. No matter if you are looking for a separate amp, an integrated amp, or stereo receivers, make sure that you always determine the total power available first. Keep in mind that smaller amps have 15 to 30 watts, while larger models have over 100. For most people an amp in the lower-watt range will be adequate for their needs. Make sure that you also check out the amp’s THD, which refers to how much the amp will potentially impact signal quality. You want to choose an amp that has very low THD, meaning that you get better signal quality.